Goan Dogs | Live Review

Goan Dogs

It feels like tonight they’re sealing their status as one of Bristol’s most loved forward-thinking artists.

I entered the Louisiana hungover, bleary eyed and filled with the bitter disappointment of an overpriced energy drink. But you can always rely on live music to turn things around.

Rebecca Clements has the power to curdle your heart, upon the divine notes of ‘Coma Boy’ the staggering talent of this young girl is present. The gaps between songs are wedged with a respecting silence. Singing with a burning passion, tracks like ‘Lovechild’ tell that it’s only a matter of time until she’s forever swept onto national radio. Immediately I’d forgotten the lethargy with which I climbed the stairs. This is truly sublime.

Second support act The Evil Uses came as a bit of a surprise. Delivering a set swamped in off-beat instrumentation, it’s easy to come off like a bunch of no-hopers. This though is remarkable; some hybrid of rock, brass and jazz, they bring odd sounds using vintage synths that jut out from their noise. It’s so fun that come the end of their set the crowd bellow for another – something that would force the headliners to dish out their show with a bit more haste; though we’d all agree it was worth it.

Four dramatic lights are lined up against the back of the stage we all know something special is brewing. Goan Dogs take their position and jostle into two old favourites ‘Hotel Rooms’ and ‘Gasoline’. It feels like tonight they’re sealing their status as one of Bristol’s most loved forward-thinking artists. If one thing is always strikingly clear about seeing this band live, it’s their tight musicianship — they’re on a wavelength unrivalled by many other artists. The setlist brings everything we’d expect plus few new cuts, which see the desert-styled jams take a more Spanish, carnival sounding approach. The overriding factor of this band, though, is simply how easy it is to get lost in their music.

Tonight was very much a colourful, emotional and joyous affair, summing up the beaming diversity on the Bristol scene right now.

Check out ‘Hold Me Back’ right here: