Rebecca Clements | Full Interview

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There’ve been shows where I’ve played to about ten people, but I wouldn’t change any of it.

We’ve aptly fallen in love with ‘Lovechild’, excited to get another track out there having turned a lot of heads already?

I’m glad you’re enjoying it! Yes, unbelievably excited. It’s always quite nerve-wracking putting a track out as I’ve been working away at these songs, not really knowing how people are going to take to them; so to see all the great feedback has been amazing. It’s really addictive.

And you’ve been working with James Earp and Ivor Novello-nominated producer Iain Archer… what kind of impact has that been having?

It’s really brought the songs to life. To be in the same room as someone like Iain is surreal enough, let alone to be working on my music together, it’s such a buzz. I really love working with them, they understand my ideas and help give the songs a certain energy.

You’ve reached a lot of people this year, but’ve actually been grafting as a songwriter around Bristol for some time now, what’s it been like getting to this point?

It’s been crazy. There’ve been shows where I’ve played to about ten people, but I wouldn’t change any of it. Those are the shows that made me more determined and taught me to never take any of these new opportunities for granted. Whenever I walk into a studio, I feel so overwhelmed and lucky to be able to call this my job and thinking back on the old Bristol shows always drives me to make each opportunity count. It’s absolutely mad to think that these songs I wrote on my bedroom floor have actually become something.

It’s absolutely mad to think that these songs I wrote on my bedroom floor have actually become something.

You do a great job of weaving both beauty and almost nonchalance into your music, what sort of influences d’you have up in that head of yours?

It’s important for me to write lyrics in a way that is very personal to me but can also be understood by others so that they can relate. I love indie, rock bands with male, british vocals where there is a certain attitude but beauty and honesty to the lyrics. I like to write like that, quite ‘kitchen sink’ literal and when I sing; I think it’s important for my delivery to have a good balance of attitude and emotion. Influence wise, I’m reliving a lot of older albums at the moment; a bit of Radiohead, Joy Division, PJ Harvey. Sometimes it’s quite hard to enjoy the music as I find myself picking it apart and figuring out how certain sounds were created. But, when it comes to writing, my biggest influence is simply my life.

So all these deeply personal-sounding themes we hear are very autobiographical then?

They’re all written about my experiences. I write for myself as a sort of therapy, as most of what I write about I would struggle to say normally. Being nineteen, everything is constantly changing. A lot revolves around love, drugs, sex and alcohol so my songs often reflect those experiences and how i’m feeling. I tend to write a lot of depressing stuff, but i’m cool with that… I love sad songs!

We’ve enjoyed the little one-liners that have come packaged with your tracks so far, where do they come from?

I think it’s cool to let people know what you’re saying. It’s that thing about letting people in and letting them feel like they know you in order for them to connect. It’s a nice little insight for people to have there.

That said, I love the idea that people can interpret the songs and adapt their meanings to relate to their own life. When I listen to music, sometimes a lyric will hit me, yet it was probably written it for a completely different reason to the one I’ve just picked out. I think that’s what’s great about music, one song can have a thousand different meanings.

Check out ‘Coma Boy’ right here: